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Modern Jewel

In stock
SKU
WMET0121
Specialty: Giclee on Gold Leafed Paper, Straight Fit (No Mats), Hand Applied Leafing
  • Gold Leafed Paper
  • Straight Fit (No Mats), Hand Applied Leafing
  • 67"w x 55"h
:
Image MC1230SUB1
MC1230SUB1
3.75″ x 1.38″

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Modern_Jewel_49.121.1

Our Inspiration:Miniature broad collar

From Egypt, early Ptolemaic period
Gold, carnelian, turquoise, lapis lazuli; 332–246 B.C.
Harris Brisbane Dick Fund, 1949   49.121.1

Depictions of Egyptian pharaohs presenting broad collars and other items of jewelry to deities are often found on temple walls. Scenes in Ptolemaic temples tend to show semicircular collars that have long strings or chains at the back but no counterweight, an arrangement that resembles this collar. The collar does not lie flat, but slopes in a way suggesting it was meant to lie across the chest of a divine statuette; however, the long chains and lack of counterweight would make such a fit very awkward. The possibility exists that the collar was a ritual offering and was not meant for wearing.

Modern_Jewel_49.121.1

Our Inspiration:Miniature broad collar

From Egypt, early Ptolemaic period
Gold, carnelian, turquoise, lapis lazuli; 332–246 B.C.
Harris Brisbane Dick Fund, 1949   49.121.1

Depictions of Egyptian pharaohs presenting broad collars and other items of jewelry to deities are often found on temple walls. Scenes in Ptolemaic temples tend to show semicircular collars that have long strings or chains at the back but no counterweight, an arrangement that resembles this collar. The collar does not lie flat, but slopes in a way suggesting it was meant to lie across the chest of a divine statuette; however, the long chains and lack of counterweight would make such a fit very awkward. The possibility exists that the collar was a ritual offering and was not meant for wearing.