Local Storage seems to be disabled in your browser.
For the best experience on our site, be sure to turn on Local Storage in your browser.

Seated From the Viewer

In stock
SKU
WMET0130
Specialty: Giclee on Watercolor Paper, Deckled and Floated on Mat, Framed in Shadowbox, Artist Enhanced
  • Watercolor Paper
  • Deckled and Floated on Mat, Framed in Shadowbox, Artist Enhanced
  • 29"w x 25"h
:
Image MW00012586
MW00012586
0.75″ x 1.88″
:
Image B97
B97
2″

Default product specifications may be changed using our art customizer.

Maximum 250 characters
Download Tear Sheet
Seated_from_Viewer_64.153

OUR INSPIRATION: Madame Thadée Natanson (Misia Godebska) at the Theater

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (French, 1864–1901)

Oil on cardboard, 24 1/2 x 29 1/2 in., 1895

Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Richard Rodgers, 1964 64.153

Lautrec made this study for the cover of the final issue of L’Estampe Originale (1893–95), a quarterly album of original prints by young French artists. Fittingly, it shows stagehands bringing down the curtain on a performance. In the middle, a plaster elephant stands guard atop a cartouche for the table of contents. Seated at left is Misia Natanson, the glamorous patroness of poets Paul Verlaine and Stephane Mellarme, and of artists including Lautrec, Bonnard, and Vuillard. Now restored, this work was once sliced into two pieces and framed so as to reveal only Misia in her loge.

Seated_from_Viewer_64.153

OUR INSPIRATION: Madame Thadée Natanson (Misia Godebska) at the Theater

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (French, 1864–1901)

Oil on cardboard, 24 1/2 x 29 1/2 in., 1895

Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Richard Rodgers, 1964 64.153

Lautrec made this study for the cover of the final issue of L’Estampe Originale (1893–95), a quarterly album of original prints by young French artists. Fittingly, it shows stagehands bringing down the curtain on a performance. In the middle, a plaster elephant stands guard atop a cartouche for the table of contents. Seated at left is Misia Natanson, the glamorous patroness of poets Paul Verlaine and Stephane Mellarme, and of artists including Lautrec, Bonnard, and Vuillard. Now restored, this work was once sliced into two pieces and framed so as to reveal only Misia in her loge.