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City View

In stock
SKU
WMET0135
Specialty: Giclee on Canvas, Gallery Wrapped, Artist Enhanced, with Tacks, Mounted on Mat, Framed in Shadowbox
  • Canvas
  • Non-Customizable
  • 34.5"w x 29.5"h
:
Image MC2332
MC2332
1″ x 2.13″
:
Image B251
B251
2.03″
Maximum 250 characters
Download Tear Sheet
City_View_1975.1.167

Our Inspiration:View of Saint-Valéry-sur-Somme

Edgar Degas (French, 1834–1917)
Oil on canvas, 20 x 24 in., 1896–98
Robert Lehman Collection, 1975   1975.1.167

Degas’s provencal painting of Saint-Valéry-sur-Somme, a medieval town on the Picardy coast, surveys the site from an elevated vantage point, lending a view of rooftops and facades as well as backyards and gardens. This landscape was painted in the artist’s studio, where he experimented with the structure of his many pictures of the town. The particularly ambiguous foreground and fractured elements in the background may result from synthesizing two separate drawings sketched on site, the left half aligning with one sketch and the right with another. Degas once advised: “A painting is something that requires as much trickery, malice, and vice as the perpetration of a crime, so create falsely and add a touch from nature.”

City_View_1975.1.167

Our Inspiration:View of Saint-Valéry-sur-Somme

Edgar Degas (French, 1834–1917)
Oil on canvas, 20 x 24 in., 1896–98
Robert Lehman Collection, 1975   1975.1.167

Degas’s provencal painting of Saint-Valéry-sur-Somme, a medieval town on the Picardy coast, surveys the site from an elevated vantage point, lending a view of rooftops and facades as well as backyards and gardens. This landscape was painted in the artist’s studio, where he experimented with the structure of his many pictures of the town. The particularly ambiguous foreground and fractured elements in the background may result from synthesizing two separate drawings sketched on site, the left half aligning with one sketch and the right with another. Degas once advised: “A painting is something that requires as much trickery, malice, and vice as the perpetration of a crime, so create falsely and add a touch from nature.”