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Women Picking Olives

In stock
SKU
WMET0159
Specialty: Giclee on Raw Canvas, Frayed Edges, Mounted on Mat
  • Raw Canvas
  • Frayed Edges, Mounted on Mat
  • 19"w x 16"h
:
Image M0897SUB2
M0897SUB2
0.75″ x 0.88″
:
Image B452
B452
3″

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Women_Picking_Olives_1995.535

Our Inspiration:Women Picking Olives

Vincent van Gogh (Dutch, 1853–1890)
Oil on canvas, 28 5/8 x 36 in., 1889
The Walter H. and Leonore Annenberg Collection,
Gift of Walter H. and Leonore Annenberg, 1995,
Bequest of Walter H. Annenberg, 2002   1995.535

At the end of 1889, Van Gogh painted three versions of this picture. He described the first as a study from nature “more colored with more solemn tones,” and the second as a studio rendition in a “very discreet range” of colors. The present work in The Met collection, the most resolved and stylized of the three, was intended for his sister and mother, to whom Van Gogh wrote: “I hope that the painting of the women in the olive trees will be a little to your taste—I sent [a] drawing of it to Gauguin...and he thought it good...”

Women_Picking_Olives_1995.535

Our Inspiration:Women Picking Olives

Vincent van Gogh (Dutch, 1853–1890)
Oil on canvas, 28 5/8 x 36 in., 1889
The Walter H. and Leonore Annenberg Collection,
Gift of Walter H. and Leonore Annenberg, 1995,
Bequest of Walter H. Annenberg, 2002   1995.535

At the end of 1889, Van Gogh painted three versions of this picture. He described the first as a study from nature “more colored with more solemn tones,” and the second as a studio rendition in a “very discreet range” of colors. The present work in The Met collection, the most resolved and stylized of the three, was intended for his sister and mother, to whom Van Gogh wrote: “I hope that the painting of the women in the olive trees will be a little to your taste—I sent [a] drawing of it to Gauguin...and he thought it good...”