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Spring Auspices 1

In stock
SKU
WMET0061
Specialty: Giclee on Gallery Wrapped Canvas, Artist Enhanced, Hangs Horizontally and Vertically
  • Canvas
  • Gallery Wrapped, Artist Enhanced
  • 37"w x 73"h
:
Image M1123
M1123
0.38″ x 2.13″

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Outer_Robe_Uchikake

Our Inspiration: Outer Robe (Uchikake) with Peonies, Plum Blossoms, and Butterflies

Japan, Edo period

Silk damask embroidered with silk and metallic thread, late 18th–early 19th century

Purchase, Friends of Asian Art Gifts, 2008   2008.11

The uchikake is a lined silk robe with a wadded or padded hem, worn over another garment without a sash, usually for formal occasions or stage performances. The origins of the use of this garment among women of the samurai elite can be traced back to the Kamakura period (1185–1333). In the early Muromachi period (1392–1573) it was worn from early May to early September; from the end of the Muromachi period it was part of formal winter attire and made of thick materials. Starting in the mid-Edo period, it was constructed with white, black, and red figured satin and often fully embroidered with multicolored threads and gold. The uchikake is still worn over a kimono in traditional wedding ceremonies. This example is embellished with auspicious symbols, such as peonies—considered the king of flowers—plum blossoms, and butterflies, which represent joy and longevity as well as marital happiness.

Outer_Robe_Uchikake

Our Inspiration: Outer Robe (Uchikake) with Peonies, Plum Blossoms, and Butterflies

Japan, Edo period

Silk damask embroidered with silk and metallic thread, late 18th–early 19th century

Purchase, Friends of Asian Art Gifts, 2008   2008.11

The uchikake is a lined silk robe with a wadded or padded hem, worn over another garment without a sash, usually for formal occasions or stage performances. The origins of the use of this garment among women of the samurai elite can be traced back to the Kamakura period (1185–1333). In the early Muromachi period (1392–1573) it was worn from early May to early September; from the end of the Muromachi period it was part of formal winter attire and made of thick materials. Starting in the mid-Edo period, it was constructed with white, black, and red figured satin and often fully embroidered with multicolored threads and gold. The uchikake is still worn over a kimono in traditional wedding ceremonies. This example is embellished with auspicious symbols, such as peonies—considered the king of flowers—plum blossoms, and butterflies, which represent joy and longevity as well as marital happiness.